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Vin Scully to return, now if we could just hear him…

vinscully

Dodgers Hall of Fame broadcaster Vin Scully says he’ll return next year for a record 66th season calling the games.
A trio of Dodgers players made the announcement in three languages in a video played on the big screen during the second inning of last night’s game. Fans erupted in cheers and gave Scully a long standing ovation.
Scully, who’s 85, began doing Dodgers broadcasts in …

Headline, Issues, News, Sports »

Lawmakers ask FCC to help end Dodger TV impasse

DODGERS

Some local lawmakers want the Federal Communications Commission to jump into the Dodgers TV mess.
Eight Congressional representatives from the L.A. area have signed a letter asking the FCC to mediate a dispute between Time Warner Cable and most of the region’s other major television providers.
Time Warner, which is paying the Dodgers $7 billion for exclusive TV rights, has been unable to make deals with …

economy, Issues, LA Noir, News, Politics, Zocalo Public Square »

Mixer: High LA rents; are wages keeping up?

friday mixer square

As cities go across the country, Los Angeles isn’t the most expensive. Rents are not as exorbitant as San Francisco or New York, but they’re pricey enough.
Average rents have been on a skyward trajectory for the few years following the financial and housing crisis. And that has people in town scrambling for cheaper areas of town in which to live.
Joe Mathews is California Columnist for Zocalo …

Environment, Headline, Issues, News »

Am I wasting water?

SONY DSC

California is in the grip of a three year-long drought, a drought that shows no sign of ending soon. In response, water districts across the state are urging their customers to take sensible measures to conserve water.
To convince people to conserve water, agencies like the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power are using both carrots and sticks. The carrots include public education campaigns …

Arts & Culture, Headline, Issues, News »

Wrecking ball claims Beverly Hills retail landmark

robinson's-may2

Demolition work has begun on a dilapidated Beverly Hills department store that once represented the height of elegant shopping in L.A. The old Robinson-May building on Wilshire Boulevard is coming down, but it’s not yet known what will be going up in its place. A previous owner had secured city approval to build a large condo complex designed by Getty Center architect Richard …

Arts & Culture, Featured, Food, Interviews, Issues »

Learning about Yiddish life before the Holocaust

Students participating in the Helix Project perform a Yiddish song at a home in Studio City.

If you ask American Jews, or really just most Americans, to picture what it was like to live as a Jew in Eastern Europe in the early 20th century, chances are you imagine a scene from “Fiddler on the Roof.”
The tale by Yiddish writer Sholem Aleichem tells the tale of Tevye the dairyman and his daughters in the poor village of Anatevka.
But the real story …

Education, Headline, Issues, News »

Amid strike threat, LAUSD and teachers ready to talk

lausdstudents

What’s a school district chief to do?
Superintendent John Deasy and the LAUSD have presented a contract proposal that would help reverse recent salary cuts by giving their biggest pay hike in a decade. But before negotiators even go back to the table this week, new United Teachers Los Angeles President Alex Caputo-Pearl has given the offer a resounding thumb’s down, calling it a “non-starter.”
Caputo-Pearl …

Featured, Interviews, Issues, News, Politics »

The war in Gaza hits home in LA

People hold signs at an anti-Israel protest on July 20, 2014. (Photo: Benjamin Gottlieb)

Hani Jamah is dentist based in San Jose. His  parents are from Gaza and Jamah still has family in the region. He’s been following the war closely, but while recently watching Al Jazeera America, he learned that members of his family had become casualties of the war. On Which Way, LA?  Warren talked to him about the news.
Here’s an edited excerpt from the interview:
I  woke up …

Environment, Headline, Issues, News »

Is fracking waste tainting Central Valley aquifers?

fracking

California regulators have ordered seven companies to stop injecting wastewater from fracking operations into underground aquifers in Kern County out of concern they could be contaminating drinking water.
The Bakersfield Californian reports the emergency cease and desist orders apply to 11 wells east and northeast of Bakersfield. State oil and gas regulators are also reviewing more than 100 other injection sites in the Central Valley.
Companies …

economy, Education, Featured, Interviews, Issues, News, Politics, Zocalo Public Square »

Mixer: The state of a border state, where Murrieta marks the spot

friday mixer square

This week, House Speaker John Boehner said it’ll be difficult to monetarily address the flow of undocumented kids across the U.S./Mexico border, until the 2008 law that allowed their travels to the aforementioned place is changed. Boehner said the anti-trafficking regulations that were put in place during the waning year of the Bush administration are being abused, and that he doesn’t foresee much progress …

Arts & Culture, economy, Education, Headline, Health Care, Interviews, Issues, News »

Skid Row artists display their work at MOCA

SKID ROW feature

Downtown LA’s Skid Row hosts the largest concentration of homeless people in the country.
KCRW’s Press Play  covered the city’s latest efforts to address the growing number of people affected by homeless.  The recent Department of Veterans Affairs scandal has motivated many, including First Lady Michelle Obama, to scrutinize how we care for our country’s homeless veterans.
Local officials are trying to change their approach to homeless …

Arts & Culture, economy, Featured, Issues, Politics »

Sonia Nazario on children crossing the US border: ‘It’s a modern day odyssey’

The Mexican border at Sasabe Arizona
Photo: Phillip Capper via Flickr/ CC

When author Sonia Nazario wrote the Pulitzer Prize winning book  “Enrique’s Journey” in 2006, nobody was paying much attention to the number of children coming across the US border. Now, as the New York Times reports, “more than 52,000 children have been caught crossing the United States border alone since October — double last year’s number.”
Back in March, Warren spoke with Nazario about the book, …

economy, Featured, Issues, LA Noir, News, Politics, Silicon Beach »

Mixer: Reporting from a foreign land is tough – just ask a Brit in LA

friday mixer square

For people who are not familiar with Los Angeles – who aren’t from here, but have to report about the things happening around here, particularly from a media and business standpoint – our neighborhood can be a pretty daunting place.  
All the eccentricities, idiosyncrasies, and moving parts behind-the-scenes make for all kinds of drama fit for an epic Hollywood screenplay.
But in real life, Matthew …

Arts & Culture, California Elections, economy, Headline, Issues, LA Noir, News, Politics, Runaway Production »

Mixer: LA County CEO headed out, so’s Hollywood production

friday mixer square

Los Angeles County CEO Bill Fujioka will retire in November, after more than seven years as the county’s top official.
Abby Sewell reports for the Los Angeles Times.
She says the county CEO has purview over 100,000 county employees and budgets and whatnot, but gets little attention aside from political writers and journalists.
Citing frustration with “the pace of reform”, Los Angeles County Supervisors scaled back Fujioka’s …

Featured, Issues, News, Politics, Sports »

Vote to decide if Golden Gate Bridge gets suicide nets

ggbridge

Bay Area officials will vote today on a $76 million plan to install suicide prevention nets on the Golden Gate Bridge. The agency that operates the bridge has previously rejected the idea of raising the railings to prevent suicides – arguing that it would drastically change the character of the 77-year-old landmark. But the suicides continue to add up. A record 46 people jumped …

Featured, Interviews, Issues, News, Politics »

LA County CEO William Fujioka to step down

Outgoing LA County CEO William Fujioka

Los Angeles County CEO William Fujioka says he will retire in November, after more than seven years as the county’s top official and more than 40 years in public service. Fujioka says he planned to leave five years ago, but the Great Recession led him to postpone his leave.
He spoke to KCRW’s Avishay Artsy about whether the County is better off now than it …

Arts & Culture, economy, Education, Environment, Food, Headline, Issues, News, Politics, water »

LACMA redesign has museum spanning Wilshire Blvd.

lacma

The L.A. County Museum of Art has unveiled a new design for its proposed $650 million makeover that would have the museum’s main building span Wilshire Boulevard – with traffic passing underneath the structure. The new design by architect Peter Zumthor was created to address concerns that the original plan to extend the museum over the La Brea Tar Pits would cast a shadows …

Education, Environment, Headline, Issues, News, Politics »

LAUSD shifts millions of dollars to close education gap

lausd

The L.A. School Board has signed off on a $6.6 billion budget for the school year that funnels hundreds of million of dollars to the district’s most disadvantaged students. The spending plan calls for a boost in new teacher hires – to up to 12,000 instructors – as well as more librarians, nurses, counselors and tutoring programs. Class sizes will also come down. The …

economy, Environment, Headline, Issues, News, Politics, Sports »

Beds for bucks: L.A. mulls major tax breaks for hotels

GRANDAVE

The L.A. City Council considers giving nearly $180 million in tax subsidies to two big downtown hotel projects. And that could be just the start. The biggest immediate beneficiary would be the long-delayed Frank Gehry-designed Grand Avenue project, which includes housing retail and restaurants, in addition to a hotel. The development would receive $138 million over the next 25 years, according to the L.A. …

Arts & Culture, Environment, Headline, Issues, News, Summer »

Commission gets more power to ensure coast access

BEACH

Beach access activists have won a big victory. Gov. Jerry Brown has signed a law giving the California Coastal Commission the authority to fine property owners who illegally block beach paths to the beach. The commission has never had that authority before. Previously, it had to go to court to have fines imposed on intransigent property owners. The new powers come as a …

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