Arts & Culture, Dishing Up, Food »

DISHING UP THE HOLIDAYS: Javier Cabral’s Chile Roasted Turkey with gravy

Posted November 30, 2015 by | 0 Comments | ]

Every Monday for the next several weeks, we’re talking with a range of people — from restaurant chefs to home cooks — about holiday food traditions from different communities throughout Southern California.
It’s a series we’re calling “Dishing Up the Holidays.” Last week we heard about a stellar mac and cheese recipe. This week, we talk turkey with Javier Cabral.

Javier is the West Coast staff writer for …

Arts & Culture, Dishing Up, Food »

DISHING UP THE HOLIDAYS: Alisa Reynolds’ gluten-free Mac & Cheese

Posted November 23, 2015 by | 0 Comments | ]

When you think of the holidays, you probably think of things like gathering around the table with family and friends; gift giving; and watching hours and hours of college football. But what would Thanksgiving be without your mom’s sweet potato casserole or your Uncle Irv’s deep-fried turkey; or gift giving without your dad’s killer eggnog; or watching all those bowl games without chicken wings?
Holiday …

Education, News »

Cal State University faculty take a strike vote

Posted October 26, 2015 by | 0 Comments | ]
CSULA Student Union Photo: Justefrain/Creative Commons

About 25,000 professors, lecturers, librarians, counselors, and other staff throughout the California State University system have been voting on whether to give their union the authority to call a strike. The strike vote is scheduled to wrap up this Wednesday.
At the heart of it is a dispute over pay. Management is offering a 2 percent across the board pay raise—faculty and staff are calling …

Environment, Issues »

An electric-powered cross-country road trip

Posted October 21, 2015 by and | 0 Comments | ]
Brian Kent's Nissan Leaf charging in Ohio. Photo credit: Brian Kent

What’s the conventional wisdom about electric cars? They’re quiet, they have nice pick-up, they’re good for getting around town, but, because of their limited range, they’re not suited to take on a long road trip.
Brian Kent wants to change that perception. Kent, 44, is a freelance writer based in Albion, New York. On Aug. 28 he set out on a 26,000 mile road trip …

Arts & Culture, Interviews »

Douglas Fairbanks, the first king of Hollywood

Posted October 20, 2015 by and | 0 Comments | ]
1934 Publicity photo of Douglas Fairbanks, Sr. for his final film, "The Private Life of Don Juan." Photo credit: Public domain

When we think of people in the movie business who’ve played major roles both in front of and behind the camera, names like Robert Redford, Woody Allen, and Angelina Jolie tend to come to mind. But there was a much earlier generation of movie stars who did it all—one of them was Douglas Fairbanks.
Tracey Goessel is the author of a new Fairbanks biography, “The …

Education, Issues, News, Politics »

New law aims to keep kids in the right math class

Posted October 7, 2015 by | 0 Comments | ]
Photo via Flickr/Aaron Escobar

Gov. Jerry Brown has until this Sunday to decide whether to sign hundreds of bills into law or veto them. One of the bills he signed Monday deals with something called math misplacement. Math misplacement is a term that’s used when a 9th grader is held back from advancing to the next level of math, even when they’ve scored well on the tests.
The new bill puts …

News, Sports »

Beyond sports, how the Special Olympics serves its athletes

Posted July 23, 2015 by | 0 Comments | ]
Photo: Special Olympics

The Special Olympics World Games kick off Saturday July 25 with 6,500 athletes with intellectual disabilities competing in sports ranging from swimming to rollerskating.
There are also 30,000 volunteers who are helping to run the event. Organizers say it’s the biggest sporting event to be held in Los Angeles since the 1984 Olympics.
Here’s a schedule.
KCRW spoke with Jeff Carr, Chief Operating Officer of the 2015 Special Olympics World Games about the …

economy, News, The Minimum Wage »

Is raising the minimum wage really the best policy?

Posted May 22, 2015 by | 1 Comment | ]
Minimum Wage rally

This week, LA city council voted almost unanimously to raise the city’s minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2020. For labor activists, this was a big win. And for politicians, it signaled a commitment to getting workers out of poverty. Business owners disagreed. But surprisingly, some labor economists disagreed as well.
Is it possible that raising the minimum wage isn’t actually the best path toward …

Environment »

New project to expand the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area

Posted May 4, 2015 by | 0 Comments | ]

LA gets a bad rap for not having enough parks and open space. But a campaign is underway to protect more of the open space we do have. The National Park Service is considering expanding the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area to include land in what’s called the Rim of the Valley Corridor–stretching from the Conejo and Simi Valleys to the La Crescenta …

California Elections, News, Politics »

How to get more women in California’s political leadership

Posted March 3, 2015 by | 0 Comments | ]


Last week, Republicans in California’s state Senate chose Jean Fuller as their new leader. When Fuller takes over as Senate GOP leader this fall, she’ll be the first woman from either party to hold a leadership position in that chamber, and three out of four of the top leaders in the state legislature will be women. The others–who are already on the job–are Assembly Speaker Toni …

Cargoland, economy, News »

Cargoland: A brief history of the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach

Posted December 1, 2014 by | 2 Comments | ]
A cargo ship docks in San Pedro. Photo: Saul Gonzalez

All week, KCRW looks at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. Explore Cargoland.
The ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach  have been a driving force in Southern California’s economy for more than a century. The push to establish the port of L.A. came when a harbor commission was set up in 1907. But the debate over where to put the port was heated.
Director of the Los …

California Elections »

Updated with results: The Nov. 4 ballot measures

Posted October 24, 2014 by and | 5 Comments | ]
By seeingimonkey via Flickr

Seems like it wasn’t that long ago that we were talking about plans for summer vacation and weekends at the beach.  But now Columbus Day has come and gone; Halloween is a week away; and Election Day is just around the corner.  That means it’s time to take a closer look at some of the issues California voters will be weighing in on next …

Education, Interviews, Issues, News »

Deasy under increasing scrutiny from School Board

Posted September 29, 2014 by | 0 Comments | ]

The L.A. School Board is expected to hold a closed-door meeting tomorrow. That in itself is nothing out of the ordinary.
What is unusual is that this is a specially called closed door meeting. And L.A. Times education reporter Howard Blume says the focus will almost certainly be on the future of LAUSD Superintendent John Deasy.
Deasy has been under fire for issues connected to the …

Arts & Culture, Interviews, News »

Joan Rivers’ archive? The joke could be on all of us

Posted September 26, 2014 by | 0 Comments | ]

When many of us sit down to draw up a will and think about what we might leave to our heirs, we’re looking at perhaps a home, a car, some jewelry, maybe some stocks.
But when it comes to a celebrity, there can be a lot more involved – especially memorabilia.
And that got Seth Abramovitch – a senior writer at the Hollywood Reporter – thinking. …

Arts & Culture, News »

The Northridge Earthquake through opera

Posted August 19, 2014 by | 0 Comments | ]
The libretto follows seven young, diverse angelenos  in the aftermath of total devastation. 
Photo: Long Beach Opera

It’s been 20 years since the Northridge Earthquake rocked Southern California, and now that natural disaster is the setting for an opera that’s having its L.A. premiere at the Ford Amphitheater this Saturday. The opera is called, “I was looking at the ceiling and then I saw the sky” and is by composer John Adams with a libretto by poet June Jordan.
The title, “I was …

Arts & Culture »

The hidden history of California’s parks

Posted July 7, 2014 by | 2 Comments | ]
Cathedral Cove
Crystal clear water, kelp forests, sea caves, sea birds, and sea lions all may be seen from the Cathedral Cove overlook on East Anacapa. (Photo:

July 4th has come and gone, which means that summer is officially here. Given any thought yet to where you might go on vacation?
We’re looking at some of California’s less well-known state and national parks—going beyond the superstars like Yosemite, Sequoia, and Joshua Tree to some of the places that tend to get passed by. Some of them, you can cover in a few hours. …

News »

Low-tech but vital: Braille in the 21st Century

Posted June 20, 2014 by | 0 Comments | ]

You’ve probably seen it on the front of an ATM or by the up-and-down buttons for an elevator. I’m talking about Braille — the system of raised dots and spaces that blind and visually-impaired people use to write and to represent numbers and letters of the alphabet.
More than 60 blind and visually-impaired kids from across the U.S. and Canada are gathering in Los Angeles …

News, Politics »

Los Angeles lobbies Washington

Posted April 29, 2014 by | 2 Comments | ]
Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky

The LA County Supervisors are packing their bags and heading to Washington DC this week for their annual lobbying trip. They’ll be meeting with members of Congress and folks at the White House:  talking about what they need, what’s working and not working–and their wishlist when it comes to federal funding. Supervisor Zev Yaroslavky says one of the issues high on their agenda is healthcare.
“With the affordable …

Arts & Culture, Environment, News »

One Thing: Dining

Posted January 1, 2014 by | 2 Comments | ]

From politics and music to television, health and sports, what were the most important stories and trends of the year? Nine of our sharpest local observers weigh in on the one thing that shaped 2013. 
Los Angeles Times restaurant critic Jonathan Gold talks about the “extreme locavorism” that has gripped the food scene here in Southern California. The idea that food should come from the area we …

Interviews, Issues, News, Politics »

One Thing: Local Politics

Posted December 26, 2013 by | 2 Comments | ]

From politics and music to television, health and sports, what were the most important stories and trends of the year? Nine of our sharpest local observers weigh in on the one thing that shaped 2013. 
“There’s probably no city in the country now whose labor movement is as strong and effective as the LA labor movement,” says Raphael Sonenshein, Executive Director of the Pat Brown Institute at …

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