Artist Spotlight, Audiophiles, Featured, Jazz, Music History, Recollections & Rediscoveries »

Miles Davis’s Landmark LP “Miles Ahead”: Enduring Fascination & Beauty

Posted December 7, 2016 by | 0 Comments
r-2543628-1311271592-jpeg

I recently pulled out my new-ish audiophile copy of Miles Davis‘s great 1957 LP with the Gil Evans orchestra, Miles Ahead. I’ve listened to this album a zillion times, yet I hear something new almost each and every time I put it on the turntable. I’ve worn out an older copy of the LP, and now enjoy a great mono recording.
I know the work well, and have …

Featured, Headline, Latin, Music History, Recollections & Rediscoveries, Rhythm Planet Music Show »

Show #187: Cuban Classics–A Personal Selection Part 1

Posted December 2, 2016 by | 0 Comments
51dvkfmorul-_ss500

  
With Fidel’s passing I wanted to play some Cuban music I really love. This is a personal selection, and if you’re wondering why there’s no Buena Vista Social Club, Cachao, or Gloria Estefan, we’ll have a sequel next week with more sizzling Cuban music.
We start with a Coca-Cola commercial from 1952. The beverage giant was a player on Cuban soil back …

Featured, Latin, Music History, Recollections & Rediscoveries »

Cuban Music: Wonderful but Complicated by Politics!

Posted November 30, 2016 by | 0 Comments
81pf3dziol-_sy679_

 
Cuba is such a musical country, and it’s hard to find a Havana street that doesn’t have music coming out of a storefront. The rich brew of Cuban music consists of African rhythms, Spanish décima poetry that dates back to the 16th century, American jazz, plus other ingredients that together provide synergy, power, and flavor. The many styles of Cuban music include mambo, timba, bolero, guaracha, rumba, contradanza, trova, classical, danzón, son …

Featured, French, Jazz, Music History, music phenomena »

Jazz Musicians the Beat Poets and French Existentialists Loved

Posted November 21, 2016 by | 2 Comments
415bv6vnbxl

When the word “beat” is used in the context of the arts, it’s usually in reference to the Beat Generation writers: Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, Gregory Corso, and William S. Burroughs are the most well-known. Michael McClure won fame for writing the poem “Mercedes Benz” that Janis Joplin popularized, Gary Snyder was a forest ranger who wrote while stationed in treetops, …

Artist Spotlight, Featured, Jazz, Music History »

Paul Desmond: That Dry Martini Sound

Posted November 16, 2016 by | 0 Comments
51qa926r9sl

 
Paul Desmond, an alto saxophonist, once said he tried to sound like a dry martini. He succeeded in that. Many people know jazz pianist Dave Brubeck‘s work, especially the famous 1959 Columbia session, Time Out. Fewer know that the most famous song on that million-selling album, “Take Five,” was written by Desmond. Desmond balanced the heavy-handed chords of Brubeck with a light, airy sound that was …

Artist Spotlight, Classical, Featured, Music History, New Releases »

Tchaikovsky’s Powerful Sixth Symphony Gets Great New Reading

Posted November 9, 2016 by | 1 Comment
51buu0cgr6l-_ss500

I’ve been listening to a new recording of Tchaikovsky’s last symphony, the Sixth–named the Pathétique–paired with the romantic masterpiece Romeo & Juliet. It is a wonderful recording, with Russian conductor Semyon Bychkov leading the Czech Philharmonic on the Decca Classics label, which is famous for the quality of their recorded sound. This is the first volume of “The Tchaikovsky Project” recording cycle that will eventually cover all of the …

Blues, Featured, Interviews, Jazz, Music History, RIP »

Phil Chess, Co-Founder of Chess Records, RIP

Posted October 24, 2016 by | 0 Comments
imgres-1

Phil Chess, co-founder of Chicago’s legendary Chess Records, has died at the age of 95. Born Fiszel Czyz in Motol, Poland, in 1921, he changed his name after moving to Chicago, a city with a large Polish population and a home of the blues. With his brother Leonard, he founded Chess Records in 1950. Just a year later, one of the first great rock and roll records, Ike …

Featured, Music History »

Crumhorns, Sackbuts and…Oliphants?

Posted October 19, 2016 by | 0 Comments
sf17-190-218s2

As a lover of early (pre-renaissance) music, I’ve heard my share of medieval instruments like the vielle, rebec, sackbut and crumhorn. Add to that list the oliphant, which I learned about more recently. It is not to be confused with the modern-day large pachyderm (though the name is an ancient variant of elephant) nor the lumbering creature from the Lord of the Rings. And it …

Artist Spotlight, Classical, Featured, Music History, music phenomena, Recollections & Rediscoveries »

The Modern and Edgy Music of Bartok and Hindemith

Posted October 5, 2016 by | 0 Comments
91m97bhezal-_sx522_

Just as Dave Brubeck or Chet Baker are considered “gateway” (aka accessible) artists for an introduction to jazz, so are Maurice Ravel and Claude Debussy for classical newbies who are searching for something other than Bach or Mozart. But if you’re ready to move beyond classical music’s greatest hits, I recommend exploring the music of Béla Bartók and Paul Hindemith. I find their music modern and edgy.
I was introduced …

Artist Spotlight, Featured, Music History, Performances & Events »

Kraftwerk Electrifies at the Hollywood Bowl

Posted September 21, 2016 by | 0 Comments
search-1

I was lucky enough to attend Kraftwerk’s spectacular 3-D show this past Sunday at the Hollywood Bowl. The group looked just like their album covers: 4 guys standing in front of small pedestal platforms with keyboards on them. They wore identical form-fitting jumpsuits with a glowing grid pattern, which seemed to change colors as the videos changed. (Did anyone else think that they could have stepped out of …

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

BROUGHT TO YOU BY