Artist Spotlight, Audiophiles, Jazz, Music History, RIP »

Rudy Van Gelder, Legendary Jazz Engineer (1924-2016) RIP

Posted August 25, 2016 by | 1 Comment
CquaES_WcAE7T0M

I have been dreading the day I would hear this news. But it’s true, Rudy Van Gelder (RVG) has died at the age of 91. He became legendary, but started out recording late-night sessions in his parents’ living room in the early 1950′s while attending optometry school by day. Thank goodness he didn’t pursue an optometry career!
The other day I pulled out his 1953 recording for Prestige, Bag’s …

Artist Spotlight, brazilian music, Classical, Jazz, Music History, Performances & Events »

Antonio Carlos Jobim and Vernon Duke: Dual (Composer) Personalities

Posted August 15, 2016 by | 0 Comments
51vvuTE1M9L._SY355_

I was at the Hollywood Bowl last Saturday night for the big “An Olympic Carnival – Sergio Mendes & 50 Years of Brasil ’66” show, which opened with the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra playing Brazilian classics. It was a great program–beautifully conducted by Thomas Wilkins, with fantastic guest dancers and singers, plus a spectacular fireworks finale.
The show started with “Aquarela do Brasil,” Ary Barroso‘s 1939 classic, a Brazilian musical …

Artist Spotlight, Jazz, Latin, Music History, Rhythm Planet Music Show »

Show #171: Stan Kenton & Tito Rodriguez: Anatomy of an Orchestra

Posted August 12, 2016 by | 0 Comments
R-3266597-1323070839.jpeg

In 1952, Stan Kenton recorded a piece called “Prologue: This is An Orchestra.” In the 10 minute work he introduces all the members of his jazz orchestra: the drummer, bassist, saxophonists, trumpet player, trombone, and bass trombone player. In the bass trombone part he tells George Roberts to go lower, to the bottom of the instrument’s capability, which he does. Kenton also talks about …

brazilian music, Latin, Music History »

Musings on Brazil as the Olympics Near

Posted August 3, 2016 by | 0 Comments
View of Corcovado. Photo by Pedro Vasquez Colmenares (CC BY-NC 2.0) via Flickr

With the Summer Olympics in Rio just two days away, I’m thinking about our great southern neighbor. Caetano Veloso once told me that Brazil is “the great other.” The largest Latin American country but the only Lusophone nation, separated by Pope Julius II in the 1494 Treaty of Tordesillas so that Spain and Portugal would not fight over dominion of newly-discovered lands. Caetano implied that this …

Artist Spotlight, Jazz, Music History »

Miles Davis Wouldn’t Have Envied Sly Stone Later On

Posted July 25, 2016 by | 0 Comments
Hot_Fun_in_the_Summertime_-_Sly_&_the_Family_Stone

Miles Davis once groused that in big Bill Graham-type rock shows in the late 60′s and early 70′s, that he was only making $10k per appearance and not the $50k that Sly and the Family Stone were getting. Davis also once said that Sly Stone “was my only peer.” This was during the Betty Mabry days when Miles was making funk/pop records, to the …

Audiophiles, Music History, music phenomena »

L.A.’s Musical Treasure Chest

Posted July 20, 2016 by | 0 Comments
IMG_3351

I’m about to record an unusual program featuring non-human music…think whales, insects, frogs, and birds. For this show, I pulled out an obscure 1986 LP by composer Graeme Revell called The Insect Musicians. It was my first encounter with this prolific composer, who more recently has been successful in film composing.
What I noticed when pulling out the record was that I purchased it from Tower Records many …

Artist Spotlight, Jazz, Music History »

Morton Gould and John Coltrane

Posted July 18, 2016 by | 0 Comments
51KA7OW8mEL

Mosaic Records is a company that produces amazing box set reissues under the watchful eye of jazz curator and “spelunker” Michael Cuscuna, who goes deep into the record company jazz vaults to recover buried treasures and share them with other jazz fans. Thanks to a tip on Mosaic’s blog, I learned the origins of a seminal John Coltrane recording, one that started me on a jazz …

Artist Spotlight, Music History, world music »

For Victor Jara, Chile’s Nueva Cancion Martyr, Justice Might Finally Come

Posted July 6, 2016 by | 0 Comments
By Rec79 - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8702009

I have followed the nueva canción (new song) movement for a long time. It championed human rights and freedom against the backdrop of dictators and police brutality in Argentina and Chile in the 1970′s. Mercedes Sosa was exiled to Spain after being threatened by the Argentine junta with death. Sosa gave us immortal anthems like “Soy Paz, Soy Pan, Soy Más” and the great …

Artist Spotlight, Classical, French, Music History »

Hector Berlioz: Fame Started with Defenestration

Posted June 20, 2016 by | 0 Comments
419GMB83ERL

I recently saw a bottle of red wine with the name “Fenestra.” It made me think of one of Russian musicologist/lexicographer Nicolas Slonimsky’s favorite oddball words, “defenestrate,” which means to jump out of or throw something or someone out of a window. “Fenestra” is Italian for window; in French it’s “fenêtre.” (The English word “window” has a Norse origin).  According to Wikipedia:  the term was coined around …

Artist Spotlight, Jazz, Latin, Music History, music phenomena »

How Dizzy Gillespie and U.S. V.P. Dan Quayle’s Business Card Saved A Great Cuban Trumpeter

Posted June 6, 2016 by | 0 Comments
search

It’s not easy to be a jazz musician – or anything but a classical musician - in Cuba.  It’s like the former Soviet Union, where jazz was forbidden and banned. Stalin sent Russia’s Louis Armstrong, Eddie Rosner, to the gulag (Soviet jazz fans called Satchmo the American Eddie Rosner). It’s hard enough to even get a decent instrument if you’re a young Cuban musician; and since you have …

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

BROUGHT TO YOU BY