SORRY – THE CONTEST IS CLOSED! THANKS FOR YOUR COMMENTS.
CONGRATS TO AUTUMN, LILI, ARTURO, CHRISTINE AND BRIDGET!

On Monday the 4th at The Landmark, Focus Features will hold a double-bill screening of these two amazing Oscar-nominated animated films (tons of great info HERE) – and I’ll be hosting a Q&A with the filmmakers between the two screenings. It’s open to members of the guilds – and people who read this blog!

If you’re interested in attending, comment below and tell me this: what’s one of your favorite stop-motion animation sequences or effects – and why?  Could be from “Gumby,” “Fantastic Mr. Fox,” a TV commercial or a Ray Harryhausen movie!  Personally, I was tickled every time the light shined through Norman’s ears in “Paranorman” – it just looked so beautiful and felt so physical.

Don’t forget to leave your name and e-mail address so I can contact you if you’re one of the five lucky people I’ll put on the list – and I’ll reserve seats for you and a guest!  I’ll choose winners on Thursday the 31st at noon. All decision by the judges (me!) is final.

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  • Anonymous

    Honestly, my favorite was a Nissan 300ZX commercial from the ’80s, with Barbie and Ken dolls, a toy 300ZX, and a rocking Van Halen playing “You Really Got Me.” See it on YouTube. Fantastic!

  • Anonymous

    Oh, reach me at artful.eric@gmail.com. Thanks!

  • Anonymous

    My all time favorite stop motion sequence comes from “Fantastic Mr. Fox”. It lasts about 45 seconds and it shows Jimmy Squirrel and Co moving furniture into the Foxes new tree home. I probably rewind it about 10 times just for this tiny little scene. But anyway, I love being able to watch just this little cutaway and EVERY time I watch I see some new detail. You notice the different reactions of the squirrels to the boss, the grain on the furniture, tiny hands, – etc. And I think it is sort of encompasses what stop motion is- craft, detail, and wonder. I can always watch just this 45 seconds of squirrels and be amazed to see something new every time.

  • Anonymous

    Wow, what a difficult question. And how sad that I live on the East Coast and am in my spring semester right now, I wouldn’t be able to go even if I won! :( It would be an amazing experience as an animation student.
    But after sitting in my room silently for about 10 minutes replaying all my favorite scenes in my head I found I couldn’t choose. I think my favorite moments in a stop-motion film are the little ones. The actions that are added and you don’t really notice them, but without them, they wouldn’t be nearly as convincing. PES does an amazing job of that in “Western Spaghetti” and “Fresh Guacamole”. The bit of avocado that stays on the knife as he cuts around the pit..
    Gromit of Walace and Gromit, and all his legendary little eye movements that tell so much.
    Neil in ParaNorman and his small reactions to things throughout the film, like when Norman shouts “the tree told me!” and you get a glimpse of Neil’s face. Shock, embarrassment, fright, all in one little facial expression..

    I could go on for days, but I figured I should stop before this becomes a short story haha. There should be another one of these events during the middle of the summer! I would love to come!
    Emily Thompson
    emilymarie38@gmail.com

  • Anonymous

    one of those old Aardman shorts like “not with out my handbag” or “Adam”
    hand bag because of how strange and colorful it was and Adam because of the symbolism. i think; as far as stopmotion is concerned, these were the films that got me ito animation.
    my name is Kevin Kovacs

  • Anonymous

    Being in Highschool and in Canada I cant exactly fly to California during my exams lol but if I where to enter the contest I would say my favourite moment in stop motion animation would be the opening sequence to Coraline. So meticulous and detailed. I think watching Pingu as a kid and then Coraline was what made me start animating for myself.

  • Anonymous

    Seeing as ParaNorman and Coraline are my two favorite movies I might as well give this a try! One of my favorite scenes would have to be the moment in ParaNorman when it’s revealed who the witch really is. The acting in that scene is so amazing and you can even see that they stop motion animated Norman’s pupils! I remember watching that scene for the first time in the theater and gasping out loud. It’s so powerful.
    Nikki Chapman
    nikkichapman6@gmail.com

  • Anonymous

    I would have to say I am really inspired by all of PES’s work, especially Western Spaghetti. It is just witty-how he translate every day objects into an everyday meal. It’s uncanny and brilliant. Really challenges the viewer to make the familiar unfamiliar.

    asburke39@gmail.com if I win! Thanks!

    Cheers,
    Alyssa

  • Anonymous

    I would have to say I am very inspired by all of PES’s work, especially Western Spaghetti! It is simple and witty-how he translates every day objects into an every day meal. It challenges the viewer to make the familiar unfamiliar. It also highlights the magic of stop motion by not trying to hide the fact that it is not live action nor computer animated. It has a handmade feel to it, and that is what stop motion is all about.

    asburke39@gmail.com if I win
    Thanks!
    Cheers, and keep animating!
    Alyssa

  • Anonymous

    Sorry for posting twice, I thought it didn’t post the first time.

  • Anonymous

    one of my favorite sequences from A Town Called Panic was the birthday party where the farmer (I believe) becomes an angry drunk and start trashing the place.
    gkubrick at yahoo

  • Anonymous

    I’ll start by saying what I tell everyone about ParaNorman: It is the apex, the state of the art, of modern animation because it benefits from the best of every technology: the corporeal sense from stop motion without sacrificing the visual and practical advantages of CGI.

    In ParaNorman (this is my favorite use of the technology) it is seen in the ghosts but particularly with Agatha’s, with that electric glow and the lightning and the glitching. I’ve never seen animation like that before. It certainly pushed its boundaries.

    Another scene that I’m specially fond of is in Coraline, when she and Wybie are walking in the fog. It was so natural that I really didn’t think much of it until I saw the documentary, but just how do you put fog in a stop motion movie? I think it was very clever and the result is an impeccable scene, proof that the capacity of humans for innovation is limitless.

    Thank you for such great works. Keep them coming.

    Arturo Romero
    rars@outlook.com

  • Anonymous

    My favorite stop-motion animated sequences would have to be the scene where Coraline attempts to get the soul from the other Mr. B.
    There’s the part where the mice go everywhere and attack Coraline with the cotton candy cannons. This would have to be my favorite scene because so much is going on in it. There’s so much to keep track of and so many tiny puppets to move. You can tell there was a lot of blood, sweat and tears put into that scene and it turned out amazing. The mice have moving tails and hands, the cotton candy doesn’t move somewhere it shouldn’t mid-flight and nothing looks awkward. Coraline’s facial expressions are amazing and ever-changing; in a scene like this, that couldn’t have been something simple to do.
    It amazes me each time I watch it.
    I also love the scene in ParaNorman where the zombies rise from their graves. There’s dirt and spit going everywhere. With stop motion as a medium, hours upon hours of work must have been put into that scene.

  • Anonymous

    woops, forgot to add that my email is thatannoyingfan@gmail.com

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